compoundchem
compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteriaThe prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

compoundchem:

This year’s Longitude Prize is focused on the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria. They’ve put together a nice image, shown here, which showcases what they term ‘the ten most dangerous antibiotic resistant bacteria’. You can read more detail on each of them here:http://www.nesta.org.uk/news/antibiotic-resistant-bacteria

The prize offers a £10 million prize fund for the development of a cheap, accurate, and easy to use bacterial infection test kit, which will allow doctors to prescribe the correct antibiotics at the correct time for patients, to try to help minimise the development of antibiotic resistance.

thatssoscience
thatssoscience:

Ohio Lawmakers Propose Cutting The Scientific Process Out of Education
While the battle of science standards isn’t new in the halls of government, this one hits close to home (As a former Ohioan). A bill is currently under consideration that would change the Common Core standards. In particular, the wording of this bill seeks to limit the way that science is taught. The idea is to eliminate “political… interpretation of scientific facts”, but in actuality it cuts out critical thinking. 
Memorizing facts is a crucial component of any scientific education but it isn’t enough. Understanding the scientific process builds a foundation on critical thinking. It becomes a way of looking at the world. It helps people assess the validity of information. It isn’t about “interpreting” facts, it’s about processing evidence. More importantly, it’s not just about finding answers, it’s also about knowing how to ask questions. And asking questions, is just so science. 
Photo credit: @ AlbertHerring

Ohio always has to go and be the worst

thatssoscience:

Ohio Lawmakers Propose Cutting The Scientific Process Out of Education

While the battle of science standards isn’t new in the halls of government, this one hits close to home (As a former Ohioan). A bill is currently under consideration that would change the Common Core standards. In particular, the wording of this bill seeks to limit the way that science is taught. The idea is to eliminate “political… interpretation of scientific facts”, but in actuality it cuts out critical thinking. 

Memorizing facts is a crucial component of any scientific education but it isn’t enough. Understanding the scientific process builds a foundation on critical thinking. It becomes a way of looking at the world. It helps people assess the validity of information. It isn’t about “interpreting” facts, it’s about processing evidence. More importantly, it’s not just about finding answers, it’s also about knowing how to ask questions. And asking questions, is just so science. 

Photo credit: @ AlbertHerring

Ohio always has to go and be the worst

Genetic study reveals origin of Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone

A study in the journal Science involving 78 Ebola patients in Sierra Leone revealed more than 300 genetic changes in the virus, suggesting that it is rapidly mutating and could affect how diagnostic tests and experimental treatments work. Researchers found changes in glycoprotein, a surface protein that binds viruses to human cells, allowing it to replicate in its human host. They also found that the infection in Sierra Leone stemmed from a burial of a tribal healer who treated Ebola patients from Guinea, where the virus first took hold.

NY Times—Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to Single Funeral Where 14 Women Were Infected

Reuters—Gene studies of Ebola in Sierra Leone show virus is mutating fast

Image via [x]

Should scientists be held accountable for their predictions (or lack thereof)? This is well worth the read!

Using a handheld Raman scanner and nanosized contrast agents that accumulate in brain tumors, surgeons detected and removed tiny, deadly clusters of cancer cells in mice that were not visible to the naked eye (ACS Nano 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nn503948b). If the contrast agent is proven safe for use in people, the technique could help doctors do a more thorough job of removing brain tumors and improve patient survival.