On being a lab rat

Over the past couple months I’ve volunteered as a healthy control group participant for various studies at nearby hospitals, out of boredom and mostly for the money since I was out of a job at the time. And right now, for some reason, I’ve decided to share my favorite moments from my brief stint as a human lab rat:
- taking detailed measurements on my areolas. I always knew my left boob was slightly bigger, but now I know exactly by how much! Also I’m apparently wearing the wrong bra size. Thank you science!
- my own private Skrillex concert. Next time you take an MRI, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. Wheeze whirr whirrr bang bang skreeeeeeeeee BANGARANG
- peeing into a hat. No, seriously. The container looked like a hat, a point driven further by the nurse who came into my room to drop it off wearing it on her head.
- hospital food is awesome. Especially because it was free.
- scrubs are the comfiest things ever, and absolutely do not make me look fat.
- taking public transit after a blood draw is a bad idea. Everyone kept staring at my arm and the awesome bandage and I tried really hard to communicate with everyone telepathically that no, I’m not a junkie.

That’s about it so far. I have to go to a hospital overnight again in about a month, so maybe I’ll have something to add to the list.

science-junkie
kqedscience:

Scientists Create 3D Model That Mimics Brain Function"A doughnut created in a lab and made of silk on the outside and collagen gel where the jelly ought to be can mimic a basic function of brain tissue, scientists have found.
Bioengineers produced a kind of rudimentary gray matter and white matter in a dish, along with rat neurons that signaled one another across the doughnut’s center. When the scientists dropped weights on the material to simulate traumatic injury, the neurons in the 3D brain model emitted chemical and electrical signals similar to those in the brains of injured animals.

It is the first time scientists have been able to so closely imitate brain function in the laboratory, experts said.”

Read more from the nytimes.

kqedscience:

Scientists Create 3D Model That Mimics Brain Function

"A doughnut created in a lab and made of silk on the outside and collagen gel where the jelly ought to be can mimic a basic function of brain tissue, scientists have found.

Bioengineers produced a kind of rudimentary gray matter and white matter in a dish, along with rat neurons that signaled one another across the doughnut’s center. When the scientists dropped weights on the material to simulate traumatic injury, the neurons in the 3D brain model emitted chemical and electrical signals similar to those in the brains of injured animals.
It is the first time scientists have been able to so closely imitate brain function in the laboratory, experts said.”
Read more from the nytimes.