shychemist

mindblowingscience:

See The World Through The Eyes Of A Cat

Shaunacy Ferro  

What does the world look like through a cat’s eyes? The basic structure of feline eyes is pretty similar to what humans have, but cats’ vision has adapted to very different purposes, so the world they see looks familiar, but isn’t quite the same as ours. As predators, they need to be able to sense movement well in very low light. To make that work, they have to sacrifice some of the finer detail and color perception that humans have.

Artist Nickolay Lamm, who has previously brought us visualizations of urban heat islands and sea level rise projections, took a look at the world through kitty eyes for his latest project. Lamm consulted with ophthalmologists at the University of Pennsylvania’s veterinary school and a few other animal eye specialists to create these visualizations comparing how cats see with how humans do. How we see things is represented on top; how a cat standing next to us would see the same scene appears below. 

Continue Reading.

women-in-science
bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014
The X File
This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.
Written by Nick Kennedy
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Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond GoslinCopyright held by Oregon State University Libraries
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You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

25 July 2014

The X File

This deceptively simple image revolutionised molecular biology. It also represents one of the most notorious controversies in science. ‘Photo 51’ was taken by Rosalind Franklin, who was born on this day in 1920. It is an x-ray crystallography image of DNA, created by bombarding a tiny DNA sample with x-rays for more than 60 hours. To most of us, this striped cross might not mean much, but to a few scientists in 1953 it held the secret to the structure of DNA. The controversy surrounds the instant Maurice Wilkins, who worked in Franklin’s lab, showed the photo to Francis Crick, a molecular biologist at Cambridge University, without Franklin’s knowledge. Crick published a paper with his colleague James Watson describing DNA’s double-helix structure. Wilkins, Crick and Watson shared the Nobel Prize in 1962. Franklin, whose peers never accepted her, died of cancer four years earlier, and couldn’t receive the prize posthumously.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by Rosalind Franklin and Raymond Goslin
Copyright held by Oregon State University Libraries

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

artandsciencejournal
artandsciencejournal:

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium
Recycling has never been more fun!
Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!
Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.
Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.
There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 
There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.
If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.
-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal:

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium

Recycling has never been more fun!

Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!

Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.

Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.

There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 

There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.

If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.

-Anna Paluch

molecularlifesciences

molecularlifesciences:

You’ve seen the female chemist mini-figure. Now see the whole set.

Today LEGO announced a mini-set titled “Research Institute” featuring all female scientists!

Read about this fan submitted work that won this season’s competition here. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/15401

Official announcement video here: http://youtu.be/jrWK3UIvXYs

Creator AIatariel here: https://mobile.twitter.com/AIatariel

Codebabes.com: a sexist way to learn coding

*Cue in personal rant*

This website is supposedly an educational tool. And answers the question “what if Khan Academy was run without any dignity”?

In case you were curious how it works. The more basic the lesson topic, the more clothes your “babe” has on. Not even going to try to discuss why it starts out at “virgin”…

Some highlights from The CodeBabes Philosophy: “We thought coding lessons were getting a little boring. Thus CodeBabes.com was born. Some people will like us, some people will hate us, but no matter what, you’re going to learn to write some damn code! And try not to take this too seriously ;)” “Learning should be entertaining, but we take it to the next level.” “We go fast, each lesson is a quicky, we’re pretty sure you won’t mind re-watching them :), pause it when it gets too fast, or…. ya know, FAP.” Yes, I personally would not take anyone whose philosophy is “LOL woman. must…..FAP…..” too seriously past middle school. Yes, CodeBabes, you took every basement-dweller’s dream to the next level.

Online video tutorials or softcore porn? On its own, what CodeBabes has to offer is great idea (everyone should learn basics of coding for little to no cost), but why does it need to involve half-naked women? Why aren’t there half-naked “hunks”? If you’re as a whole community trying to entice more women to learn computer science, how is this affirming that the environment isn’t a moshpit of immature man-children? I’d provide more screen shots from the more advanced pages, but I don’t want to provide them with clicks and ad revenue. Whoever came up with this thought it was funny, but in the light of recent events, all it does is leave a bad taste in your mouth. You can do better. We can do better.

*end rant*