artandsciencejournal
artandsciencejournal:

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium
Recycling has never been more fun!
Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!
Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.
Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.
There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 
There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.
If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.
-Anna Paluch

artandsciencejournal:

Plastic Bottles: The New Artistic Medium

Recycling has never been more fun!

Cubify and Coco-Cola have, respectfully, come up with innovative ways to cut waste through simple engineering. The soft drink company has created ‘caps’ with multi-functions to be placed over used plastic bottles, such as a water gun, sponge-brush for painting, sauce nozzle, and so much more!

Cubify on the other hand, has created a 3D printer, the Ekocycle Printer, that also uses plastic bottles, but in this case, as the printing material. One filament contains materials from three plastic bottles.

Unfortunately, the 3D printer is somewhat of a designer product, and the filaments are only available in black, red, white and natural, with the supposed intention of making your own accessories like jewelry or phone cases. The printer does though, come with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, so you can upload your design to any device. The idea is innovative and hopefully using plastic bottles to make useful objects will catch on with other major 3D printing companies.

There are however more grassroots organizations and individuals who use plastic waste in their 3D printing. Michigan Technological University’s Joshua Pearce is able to use milk jugs as filament for his 3D printer with the help of his RecycleBots. 

There was even a Kickstarter campaign to create the Filabot, which not only uses plastic bottles, but other plastic products as the printing filament.

If you prefer a more ‘designer’ aesthetic to your plastic recycling 3D printer, Cubify will be selling the Ekocycle Printers later this year.

-Anna Paluch

molecularlifesciences

molecularlifesciences:

You’ve seen the female chemist mini-figure. Now see the whole set.

Today LEGO announced a mini-set titled “Research Institute” featuring all female scientists!

Read about this fan submitted work that won this season’s competition here. https://ideas.lego.com/projects/15401

Official announcement video here: http://youtu.be/jrWK3UIvXYs

Creator AIatariel here: https://mobile.twitter.com/AIatariel

Codebabes.com: a sexist way to learn coding

*Cue in personal rant*

This website is supposedly an educational tool. And answers the question “what if Khan Academy was run without any dignity”?

In case you were curious how it works. The more basic the lesson topic, the more clothes your “babe” has on. Not even going to try to discuss why it starts out at “virgin”…

Some highlights from The CodeBabes Philosophy: “We thought coding lessons were getting a little boring. Thus CodeBabes.com was born. Some people will like us, some people will hate us, but no matter what, you’re going to learn to write some damn code! And try not to take this too seriously ;)” “Learning should be entertaining, but we take it to the next level.” “We go fast, each lesson is a quicky, we’re pretty sure you won’t mind re-watching them :), pause it when it gets too fast, or…. ya know, FAP.” Yes, I personally would not take anyone whose philosophy is “LOL woman. must…..FAP…..” too seriously past middle school. Yes, CodeBabes, you took every basement-dweller’s dream to the next level.

Online video tutorials or softcore porn? On its own, what CodeBabes has to offer is great idea (everyone should learn basics of coding for little to no cost), but why does it need to involve half-naked women? Why aren’t there half-naked “hunks”? If you’re as a whole community trying to entice more women to learn computer science, how is this affirming that the environment isn’t a moshpit of immature man-children? I’d provide more screen shots from the more advanced pages, but I don’t want to provide them with clicks and ad revenue. Whoever came up with this thought it was funny, but in the light of recent events, all it does is leave a bad taste in your mouth. You can do better. We can do better.

*end rant*

women-in-science

jtotheizzoe:

scishow:

i-heart-histo:

Once upon a slide…the first microbiology book for 5 year olds!

At last! No more bed time fairy tales about damsels in distress, princesses in pink and knights in white shining armor.

Move over Disney. This is a world we should be opening our kids up to. Steeped in reality. A world 1000x more exciting than those lands too far far far away, and it is all playing out under our very noses, inside our refrigerators, outside our back doors and throughout our own bodies.

Thank you to Nicola Davies (author) and Emily Sutton (illustrator) for this beautiful non-fiction children’s book that introduces young readers to microscopy.

I can’t wait to buy this for my nieces.

Let me know if you need help with the histological sequel ;)

i-heart-histo

Sources:

View more of Emily’s beautiful artwork at her website

Find out more about award winning author Nicola at her blog/website

Images and book (ISBN:1406341045) seen at amazon.com and via Walker Books 

We are SO down with this.

Where was this book when I was a kid?

3D print your own fruit

"The printer, created by a company called Dovetailed, uses a molecular-gastronomy technique called spherification to combine individual liquid flavoured droplets into a fruit shape. 

And not only can you use it to create existing fruits, you can also invent your own.

Even better, the company claims the products are all organic.

“The taste, texture, size and shape of the fruit can all be customised,” chief inventor at Dovetailed Gabriel Villar explains.

The product is designed for chefs and anyone interested in creative dining experiences, even if they have no knowledge of molecular gastronomy, and was launched over the weekend at Tech Food Hack, co-organised by Dovetailed and Microsoft Research Cambridge.”

Sources: text: Science Alert, image: 3D Print

Suspended between life and death

"Doctors will try to save the lives of 10 patients with knife or gunshot wounds by placing them in suspended animation, buying time to fix their injuries

NEITHER dead or alive, knife-wound or gunshot victims will be cooled down and placed in suspended animation later this month, as a groundbreaking emergency technique is tested out for the first time.

Surgeons are now on call at the UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to perform the operation, which will buy doctors time to fix injuries that would otherwise be lethal.

"We are suspending life, but we don’t like to call it suspended animation because it sounds like science fiction," says Samuel Tisherman, a surgeon at the hospital, who is leading the trial. “So we call it emergency preservation and resuscitation.”

The technique involves replacing all of a patient’s blood with a cold saline solution, which rapidly cools the body and stops almost all cellular activity. “If a patient comes to us two hours after dying you can’t bring them back to life. But if they’re dying and you suspend them, you have a chance to bring them back after their structural problems have been fixed,” says surgeon Peter Rhee at the University of Arizona in Tucson, who helped develop the technique.”

Read the rest at The New Scientist